Seneca Saw Works, Burdett, NY, Saw Sales, Service, Troubleshooting
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You are not going to believe what I heard today from one of my customers
02-27-2015
Today I had an appointment with an old mill customer that I haven’t dealt with in quite a while. Fortunately the mill sent its relatively new head sawyer. I think he had been in that position for just a couple of months. He was looking forward to gaining some knowledge and as many of my customers will testify to, I am opinionated enough that I am always ready and willing to share my many opinions on sawmilling, and more. As I like to point out, ask any two saw doctors a question and you will get at least three opinions.
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I run my 52” saw at 850 RPM. According to some of your articles in this magazine, that is too fast. I like that speed and I have noticed that when I hit nails and other things in the log I am much less likely to break shoulders or even bits in my saw. Wha
01-04-2015
It’s like driving your four-cylinder car in first gear all the time. It will keep carbon away from your valves, and you will never get a speeding ticket on the highway, but at what cost?
I can understand your contention that your saw is less likely to break shoulders or bits. Of course that’s because it’s grind- ing the wood instead of chipping it. Or to put it another way, instead of each tooth taking the appropriate sized bite, your saw is just trying to rub the wood into a board.
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I got a saw in from one of my customers and appar- ently the sawyer wrote on it “scrubs”. This is not one of those mills where I have the opportunity to talk directly with the sawyer. What do you think he means by “scrubs”?
01-04-2015
Most likely the term “scrubs” is sawyer-talk for a situation where the saw runs out of the log and therefore rubs the log when the sawyer gigs back the carriage. Because the saw ran out of the log, it will try to stand back up straight when exiting the cut, but it can’t because the log is in the way. If the saw had cut the right path, it would not be touching the log when the carriage reverses.
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Should I hammer saws any differently for a mill that has a vertical edger instead of a regular edger?
01-04-2015
Let me first expand your question to include mills that also have a line bar resaw.
If you are really hammering saws to a close enough toler- ance, the answer would be no. On the other hand, you may be hammering saws well enough to work okay on mills that don’t have a vertical edger or a line bar resaw. In that case my answer changes.
The fact that you are asking this question suggests to me that you are having trouble getting your saws to run properly on a mill with a vertical edger. That also tells me that your saws may be close enough to run good enough for your custom- ers who have mills with conventional edgers and no resaws, but they may not be good enough to withstand the scrutiny that happens at mills that have vertical edgers and/or resaws.
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I was hammering a saw today that was just weird enough that I thought I should share the experience with Northern Logger readers.
01-04-2015
Part of my job as a saw doctor, when I am not out trouble- shooting mills or training budding saw doctors of the future, is to hammer saws. What does that mean? In the simplest of terms, the goal when hammering a saw is to undo the last thing that happened to it. After a number of years of experience, it’s usually easy to see what went wrong at the mill by inspecting the saw. Fixing it then boils down to reversing whatever happened to it.

Since it is my job to counteract whatever happened to the saw last, the first thing I do after thoroughly cleaning it is to try to determine the last thing that occurred. Sometimes the answer to that question is obvious, like when a huge set was made while still in the cut. Other times you have to dig a bit deeper and may conclude that you might never know exactly what happened
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I have an old wooden handset mill. I used to take my saws up to the same guy for 35 years to be ham- mered and they always seemed to run okay. He has since retired and I have taken my saws to a couple of different people and after repeated attempts I am s
01-04-2015
The first rule of troubleshooting sawmills—or anything else for that matter—is to ask what else changed at exactly the same time that the trouble started.
Rule Number Two is that once you find the main cause of your trouble, you should go ahead and check the rest of the mill to see what else might have been mis-adjusted in an ef- fort to compensate for the problem.
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Sawmill myths and misinformation
01-04-2015
When I first started hammering saws, I quickly became aware that this industry was chock full of some incredible myths and old wives’ tales, although it wasn’t the wives who were spreading these tales but rather old sawyers.

Now don’t get me wrong. There was plenty of great information to be had from these old sawyers, but the problem was that although there was lots of good information, mixed in with that was a little bit of really bad information.
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The Value of Communication
04-28-2014
In the beginning of my career I would always tell new custom- ers to let me know if the saw doesn’t run right, and also to let me know if it does run right. It turned out that if the saw didn’t perform the way they wanted, I might hear from them. There seemed to be an equal probability that they would simply find someone else to work on their saws, assuming that I was just one more saw doctor who didn’t really know what he was doing. And, who could blame them for thinking that way? At the time there were some saw doctors practic- ing who really didn’t know what they were doing. But who knew? Saw hammering techniques were closely guarded secrets at the time, and customers didn’t have a good way to tell the difference between a competent saw doctor and a wayward one.
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Here is a question I am asked every now and then: “Do you believe in using a stretcher roll instead of a hammer?”
03-18-2014
Let me first say that whenever I hear that question, it soon becomes apparent that the potential customer is having problems with his mill and is trying to find out if his saws are being hammered correctly, or if there is a problem in the mill. Sometimes it’s both.
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How can I tell if the guy hammering my saws is doing it properly or not
02-21-2014
One would assume that if your mill is running and you are making lumber and showing a profit, then your saws must be hammered correctly. Unfortunately, life isn’t that simple. You might be producing lumber and making a profit, but are you producing as much lumber as you can, relative to your equipment? Are you consequently making as much profit as you should be? If not, I suppose that is why you are asking the question.
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How hard is it to teach someone how to hammer circular saws?
02-04-2014
The answer to your question really depends on which method is being taught. Just as there is more than one way to skin a sawmill, there are also many different ways to go about hammering circular saws and of course benching wide band saws is no different in that respect.
Because saw hammering used to be such a well kept se- cret, resourceful would-be anvilmen had to resort to being completely self-taught which in turn resulted in many more improper methods than good ones. Once you get past the improper hammering methods, you find that there are still many slightly different methods that are acceptable in today’s world of sawmilling.
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What is the normal speed range for a properly tensioned saw? One of the guys is trying to tell me that our saw is tensioned to run from 300 to 550 rpm, that sounds like too wide a speed range based on what I read in your article about harmonics and tensio
01-17-2014
That is way too much range. Setting the correct range depends
on the size of the saw. If you were running a 48” saw
at 500 RPM, which is too slow anyway, and you hammered it
for 500, it would probably still work at 300 which is still too
slow because it needs so little tension that there really isn’t
much of a difference between putting in enough tension for
way too slow or putting in enough tension for even slower
than way too slow.
But if you hammer a 60” saw at 550, which is a normal speed
for that size, it would not run properly at 300 because that
is way too slow for the amount of tension to make a 60”
saw run properly at 550 RPM.
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Now that winter is coming, what should I be doing differently in my mill?
12-17-2013
Actually if you are doing everything properly in your mill, not
much should change for you in the winter. But there is one
problem with that logic.
Nothing will ever be perfect in anyone’s mill. The old expression
that comes to mind is “show me something that’s
perfect and I’ll show you something you haven’t measured
close enough.” So how good is good enough?
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I will be bringing my saw out to you to get worked on. I noticed a big orange sticker on the crate that says “do not lay flat.” It is a long drive from Vermont to your shop. Do I have to stand the saw up in my pickup truck?
10-24-2013
No. It won’t hurt your saw to lay flat in the back of a pick
up truck. But there is a legitimate reason that some of the
saw manufacturers put that sticker on their crate when the
saw is new.
At one time or another almost all saws will get to take a trip
being shipped via common carrier on a tractor trailer filled
with other miscellaneous freight. Fortunately, saw crates are
traditionally round so that instead of having to have a forklift to
move it you can always just roll it anywhere you want it to go.
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The more things change the more they stay the same. A true story.
09-27-2013
A long-time customer of mine sold his automatic circular mill
to someone who moved it to their own location and was in
the process of setting it up when they called me. I knew right
off the bat that they must be new to this business because
they had the notion that they should ship their saws out to
me to be hammered and returned to them before they started
up the mill for the first time.
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Sometimes the most important question you can ask is “why?” If you are a sawmiller getting advice from another sawmiller or your local saw doctor, don’t just take that advice as gospel. Ask why that person thinks this is the right way to accomplish whatev
08-29-2013
As a saw doctor, I often have to get information from sawmillers
about some of the specifics about how their sawmill is
set up, such as RPM, hand, feed rate, species sawn, etc. During
that process, as soon as I hear a number that seems out of
whack to me, I have to ask why they do it that way.

There is a real good chance that they have a good reason
for doing whatever it is that they’re doing that way. If they
can explain the “why” of what they are doing, I should be
able to learn something new. But just hearing how they do it,
without the context of why they do it that way, doesn’t do
me much good. Having the data, along with a good contextbased
explanation, can make all the difference in the world.
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I just hit the carriage with my saw and wrecked it beyond repair as you can see from the pictures. I use the larger pin holes in my saws. Do you think that played a part in the outcome?
07-29-2013
Let me first say that the saw is not beyond repair, but upon
close inspection it appears that the cost of repairing this saw
would exceed the monetary value of a used saw. It would
cost less than the price of a new saw, but anytime the repair
cost starts to exceed a $1,000, I tend to advise purchasing
a new saw instead.
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I think I have collar trouble and I need to get my collars resurfaced. Can that be done with the mandrel in place or do I have to take it out and send it to a machine shop?
07-05-2013
If you think you have collar trouble you probably do. It is sort
of like if you think you snore a little at night, chances are that
you snore loud enough that your neighbors are well aware
of it and are not too happy.
Collar trouble is a very common problem that often goes
unnoticed for quite a while, until you are having enough
unexplained saw trouble that someone like me suggests that
you check your collars.
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Last month we talked about getting a smoother finish on your “rough cut” lumber without using a planer. Who wouldn’t want a smoother finish on their lumber? Even if your customer isn’t asking for a better finish, the smoother each board is, the more valua
05-31-2013
I’m going to assume that everyone who read last month’s
Sawmill Forum got right to work at getting all of the inaccuracies
out of their track, carriage, mandrel, and collars. That
was the hard part. Here comes the easy stuff. All you have to
do is make sure your saws are being hammered by someone
willing to work in the closer tolerances needed to generate
much less wobble in your saws.
Now comes the easiest part:
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I have a scrag mill and I need a little better finish on the cants I am producing. Should I get some saws with more teeth to produce a finer cut?
04-28-2013
Let’s first realize that by design, scrag mills tend to be relatively
crude machines. They are not as crude as a firewood processor,
but they would be considered crude in comparison to
the average modern headsaw and carriage combination and
certainly crude and inaccurate compared to a line-bar resaw.
That doesn’t mean there aren’t things that can be done to
improve the accuracy and even the smoothness of the finish.
It just means we have to work around some of the basic
design flaws.
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It seems like I get into this argument from time to time: Comparing a production band saw and a production circle saw in good working order, the band saw will tend to cut more accurate lumber than the circle saw, reason being there is less stress on the b
03-26-2013
let me first say that I completely disagree with your assertion
that a production band saw in good working order is capable
of better accuracy than a circular saw in good working order.
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It looks like my saw has a crack in it. What should I do about that?
02-27-2013
A lot of people will think that my first question will be where
is it cracked. Wrong. My first question is, are you sure it’s really
a crack instead of a nasty scratch?
I have saved a lot of saws from the scrap heap--or should I say
the sign maker--by being able to determine that the obvious
crack was in fact just a scratch that looked just like a crack.
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Hi Casey, I have been a fan of yours for years and just bought another book because the first was falling apart. I have owned a small sawmill since I was a young man, and am just finishing up starting it back up. What I was hoping you could help me with i
12-22-2012
The splitter should be located as close to the rim of the
saw as possible to avoid the problem of shims sneaking in
between the splitter and the log and pinching the saw. If all
of your saws are not the same diameter, mount it so that
it works for the biggest one, or create a way to adjust it
for different size saws.
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I can saw just about everything, except when it comes to bigger white spruce. I use a 50-inch saw, with 9/32 bits, at 600 rpm. The saw tends to dive into the log from time to time. Would a little less tension help this situation?
11-27-2012
I can’t imagine that white spruce would give you a problem,
unless it is the “bigger” that is causing your problem. Spruce
can be a bit fuzzy, so maybe going to 5/16 bits would help. But
if you lack side clearance, I would expect the saw to run out
instead of in. Is there any chance that you are having issues
with the alignment of the spreader, that only show up when
sawing big white spruce?
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I just finished working on one of my customer’s saws. To my surprise it had a very severe bend at the color line on the log side and then another severe bend in the body on the board side. I also noticed that the guideline was very shiny on both sides. Wh
10-24-2012
Fortunately what you are describing is a pretty rare occurrence,
but not so rare that I haven’t run into the same
situation a few times in my career. The simple answer is that
the saw you are describing actually had at least 2 separate
and fairly major accidents.
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On a properly tensioned saw on a proper mill, does the saw sometimes take awhile to saw straight after being straightened?
10-02-2012
Absolutely not. If it really is a properly tensioned saw on a
proper mill, it should saw properly. Of course, we are assuming
that properly tensioned saw on a proper mill was
sharpened properly and that the saw was manufactured
properly so that there are no defects in the centrality of the
vee groove and that the teeth were manufactured properly
and sharpened properly.
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I have an old hand-set mill with a 46” saw with 30 teeth in it that I run at 540 RPM. I have been trying to run it with a 60 HP diesel tractor and it seems like I just don’t have enough power. How much more power do I need?
07-23-2012
Many, many years ago I asked an old timer how much horsepower
it takes to run a sawmill, and he said about 100 more
than you have. I think his point was that there is no such thing
as too much power.

There are some
folks who assume
that power requirements
are directly
related to the size
of the saw. Actually,
your power
plant couldn’t care
less about the saw’s
diameter. That’s because
the part of
the saw that draws
power is the tooth.
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The Power of Observation Whether you are a saw doctor troubleshooting (diagnosing) a sawmill, or a medical doctor diagnosing (troubleshooting) a person, the power of observation plays a huge roll in the process.
07-05-2012
Take this photograph that somebody sent me the other day,
for example. I don’t know which mill the picture is from so I
don’t know any more about the mill than what you and I can
see in the picture. It may look like just another circular saw
headrig to you, but here’s how I look at it:
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I recently bought a used circular saw at an auction, but it only has the small pin holes in it and my mill uses the bigger ones. Can I drill that myself with a hand held drill?
05-30-2012
Your saw needs to take a trip to a machine shop that has a big
enough machine to do the job. They would either use a large
radial drill--or better yet--a very large milling machine. There
are a couple of things that will surprise a lot of people about
getting something as simple as a couple of holes drilled in a saw.
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I have a circular mill that produces about 10,000 board feet of hardwood per day. I am running a 56” saw with 50 9/32” bits on the headsaw. What can I do to increase production, utilization, efficiency and profits?
04-30-2012
Better utilization generally equals better profits although there
are no free rides in this business--or any other business, for
that matter. Better utilization will always come at a cost. The
question is whether the gains will outweigh the costs or not.
In some ways, it’s simply a math problem.
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As a saw doctor, what is the one question that all newbies feel compelled to ask you when they get their saw hammered for the first time?
04-06-2012
Every profession has one of those questions whether you’re
a realtor, a car salesman or a plumber. Aside from the familiar,
“how much does it cost?” question, the one thing that all budding
sawyers ask during their first saw hammering session:
“How long can I expect the saw to hold it’s hammering?” or,
simply “How long will this last?”
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I thought this month I would share with you an email I just received from a sawyer in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.
02-25-2012
I have been sawing hardwood and softwood for
over 30 years on a hand-set mill, 50-inch circle insert B style.
I would like to see if you agree with me on a few observations.
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Frequently asked questions:
02-01-2012
So, the caller says the saw is running out and the first thing I
ask is what the teeth look like. Are they sharpened accurately?
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I am hammering a circular saw for one of my customers and I seem to be stuck with a tension problem.
01-01-2012
Although there are very few absolutes in the world of saw
hammering, there is one rule of thumb that you can usually
count on. Remember that a finished saw can be described
as being flat on the log side, with an acceptable amount of
wobble and the right amount of tension (stretch) in the right
location.
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Today’s politics: Over the past twenty years I have seen American politics becoming increasingly polarized. It has now gotten to the point that Washington, DC is no longer able to get anything done in any sort of reasonable manner that will work for anyon
12-26-2011
The only thing that seems to make sense in today’s politics is all of the politicians’ abilities to blame other politicians for the problem. Well, now they finally got it right because they are all to blame. Apparently there is one thing they sort of agree on.
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Customer Service When we hear the term “customer service,” most of us think about the retail trade. But we all have customers and we all should be using good customer service techniques. This applies to loggers, sawmillers, and even cantankerous old saw d
11-01-2011
The first maxim that comes to mind when you think of customer service is “the customer is always right.” To me, that mantra is right up there with “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”
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Would you be able to provide written instructions on how to swage a saw bit?
10-01-2011
I am sure it would be a lot easier for me to show you than to put it in writing, but who ever said life was supposed to be easy? Swaging bits on an inserted tooth circular saw is fairly easy, but there is a certain amount of feel for it that you have to develop that is hard to describe in writing.
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I’d like to get a spare saw for my mill, but at the moment, a new one just isn’t feasible. What should I look for in a used saw?
09-02-2011
Inserted tooth circular saws in one form or another have been in existence now for more than one hundred years. In that time many patterns and styles have come and gone and in some cases, thankfully so.
If you happen to be in the market for a used inserted tooth saw, the first thing you want to check is to make sure that the blade does not have an obsolete pattern.
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To clear up an argument we have been having here at the mill, can you tell me which is better, to feed too slow or too fast?
08-01-2011
The proper feed rate is really derived from a relationship between the speed of the saw, the number of teeth per inch in the saw, the species being sawn, the gullet size, and the depth of cut. That is known as the “feed and speed relationship.”
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The Virtues of Mill Cleanliness:
07-01-2011
One of the things that the most efficient, productive, and profitable mills have in common is that they all look relatively neat and clean.
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I seem to be having a problem breaking shoulders on my saw without hitting any metal. What could cause this problem?
06-01-2011
As usual, for any given symptom in a sawmill, there are always
lots of possible causes.
The first thing to look for is bit creepage.
View PDF version here. (Opens in a new window)
I just got a new spider gauge to check the side clearances on my teeth. Do I set it up to a new set of bits?
05-01-2011
If you had a new set of bits that were perfect that you put in a saw that had perfect sockets and no bent shoulders, that would be the ideal opportunity to set up your spider gauge. The only problem is that nothing will be perfect if you measure it close enough. It would be unlikely that any one of those three things would be perfect and just about impossible for all three of them to be perfect at the same time.
View PDF version here. (Opens in a new window)
I have an old antique shingle mill. It doesn’t seem to want to feed properly, because I suppose it isn’t cutting properly. What do you suppose is the problem?
04-01-2011
All circular saws operate on the same principles, as do band saws. Shingle saws have a bit of a different configuration as compared to headrig saws, but they are doing essentially the same job as any rip saw.
Many of my faithful readers already know what I am about to say next. Have you looked at the sharpening? As with any saw, that is always the first place to check.
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The only difference between troubleshooting winter sawing problems and summer sawing problems is that the offending winter sawing problem can be much more subtle, and yet still create problems for you. In other words, there are things that can be out of a
02-28-2011
Sharpening
Inaccurate sharpening is always a first on my list of possible causes of saw trouble. Grossly inaccurate sharpening will never work, no matter what the season is, but it is true that during the more forgiving summer months you are able to live with a small amount of inaccurate sharpening. Come winter time you had better watch out because that small inaccuracy that you can’t even detect without your glasses on (if you are over 40) can easily be enough to start causing major sawing trouble.
View PDF version here. (Opens in a new window)
Winter Sawing: It’s been a fairly cold start to the winter in the Northeast this year and as a result some of the saws out there are back to their old tricks.
02-04-2011
Let me first say that if your equipment is in
good shape you should be able to saw frozen timber properly.
However, just because your mill was in good enough shape
to saw unfrozen timber properly, doesn’t necessarily mean it
is good enough to get the job done with frozen logs. Frozen
logs are not impossible to saw, but they certainly do present
a bit more of a challenge than the unfrozen ones.
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He said “given the current state of the economy, aren’t you sorry you taught all of those people how to hammer saws?”
01-01-2011
Of course my answer to both of them was exactly the same. I
am glad that I was willing to teach people this profession and
I am especially proud of the ones I taught who have gone on
to become really good at hammering saws. And I am proud
of myself for having a hand in that education.
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Disclaimer: The best medical advice a saw doctor can give you is that if you get your medical advice from a saw doctor, you should see a psychiatrist. That should be all the disclaimer that you need.
11-29-2010
Control is the main key.
Statistics say that the better your control, the less likely you
are to develop the nasty side effects associated with diabetes.
Keep in mind that those are only statistics. There are many
cases where a person with the best control develops side
effects while a person with lousy control remains side effect
free. But you still have to put your money on the statistics
and make sure that you are doing your part to keep the
odds in your favor.
View PDF version here. (Opens in a new window)
It seems this is a problem that, while odd for most conventional saw mills, is fairly common with scragg setups.
11-02-2010
Generally when a conventional-head rig sawmill has trouble with a saw, the saw is running out of the log as opposed to running in. Occasionally I will see a saw with reported symptoms of running in. In these cases, the saw appears to be dished towards the log side--either from an operational incident, or from being hammered by someone who subscribes to the old and worn theory that circular saws should be dished towards the log side so that they can stand up straight when up to speed.
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Sometimes when I am trying to figure out what is wrong with my mill, I just don’t know where to start. What is the first thing to check usually?
10-12-2010
When it comes to troubleshooting techniques, there isn’t much of a difference between saw doctors and medical doctors, except that medical doctors “diagnose” instead of “troubleshoot.” Same idea; different terminology.
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Here is an interesting case I had recently.
09-01-2010
Of course the person who brought the saw in knew nothing
about what might have happened to it. But as usual, these
saws have stories to tell if you know where and how to
look.
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Casey Creamer Northern Logger Columnist & Saw Doctor
07-26-2010
Casey Creamer, 56, grew up in Bucks County, Pennsylvania,
right outside of Philadelphia. A car racing enthusiast, he
and his friends made their way up to Watkins Glen, New
York
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We’re scratching our heads over alternatives to manually setting saw guides--looking for a safer way.
07-26-2010
The specs I’ve read say 1/32” clearance. Can’t it be set
when the blade is stopped despite the dish in the saw?
View PDF version here. (Opens in a new window)
As many of my readers know I am always willing to troubleshoot mills over the phone (or even via email) for free as long as the person on the other end can give me good, accurate data and answers to my questions.
07-01-2010

Articles at Seneca Saw Works, Burdett, NY, Saw Sales, Service, Troubleshooting, As many of my readers know I am always willing to troubleshoot mills over the phone (or even via email) for free as long as the person on the other end can give me good, accurate data and answers to my questions.

On the other hand, there are times when either the data
isn’t reliable enough, or I just have to see things for myself
for one reason or another. That is the kind of situation that
calls for me to make an onsite troubleshooting visit to the
mill, which of course is not for free.
View PDF version here. (Opens in a new window)
Here is one that had me baffled for a while.
06-01-2010

Articles at Seneca Saw Works, Burdett, NY, Saw Sales, Service, Troubleshooting, Here is one that had me baffled for a while.

My customer and I both noticed that the teeth were pointed
off to one side (the board side). The bits were not off center
(like from a mis-manufactured vee groove) and the bits were
not improperly side ground or mis-manufactured in any way
that I could detect.
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Why does the collar line look so weird on that saw and what does it tell you?
05-01-2010

Articles at Seneca Saw Works, Burdett, NY, Saw Sales, Service, Troubleshooting, Why does the collar line look so weird on that saw and what does it tell you?

The first thing it tells me is that you have a customer who needs you to educate him a bit. What the picture tells me is that your customer is spraying some WD-40 on the saw when it gets hot, in hopes of cooling it off so that he can keep sawing.
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I have a firewood processor with a big circular saw on it. Do they need to be hammered too?
04-01-2010
Whether they are on firewood processors, or machines that
are designed to cut tree length logs into saw log lengths, they
need to be maintained much in the same way that a circular
rip saw (head saw) needs to be maintained.
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Old habits are as hard to break as the old myths that fed them. Or to almost paraphrase an old Tina Turner song, “What’s Lead Got to do with It?”
03-01-2010
Of all of the things there are in your mill to adjust to keep your saw running properly, lead is not the one you want to mess with.
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Emails, I get emails. To: casey@senecasaw.com Subject: Tolerance in saw mandrel bearings
02-01-2010
I don’t like the knock in the bearing, so it is good that it has
been resolved.
I am more concerned about endplay, than I am about movement
up and down.
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Sawmill Forum - Trends
01-01-2010
Trends from one saw doctor’s perspective.
2009 has been a tough year for the lumber industry, to say
the least. I have seen many of my customers slow way down,
close their doors, or go out of business.
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Sometimes my circular saw just doesn’t seem to run properly no matter who hammered it or when it was done. Where do I start?
12-01-2009
The three most important things to check first when having saw trouble are sharpening, sharpening, and sharpening.
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One of the questions I am asked most is how long a freshly hammered saw should last.
11-01-2009
My standard answer is that if the saw is running properly when
you first put it on after being hammered, then the length of
time it will perform properly is directly related to how you
and your mill decide to treat the saw.
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I just wrecked my best saw. I have heard that you can’t weld more than three shoulders in a row or more than six on the same saw.
10-01-2009
When it comes to replacing broken shoulders by welding new ones on, there are a few things we have to consider.
1. Safety.
2. Accuracy and effectiveness.
3. Cost effectiveness.
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Scragg saw blades both running out of the log.
09-01-2009

Articles at Seneca Saw Works, Burdett, NY, Saw Sales, Service, Troubleshooting, Scragg saw blades both running out of the log.

Scragg saws operate on essentially the same set of principles that any other circular head rig operates on. You need saws that are sharpened accurately and hammered correctly with the log side flat, an acceptable amount of wobble and the right amount of tension in the right location. After that you need the right amount of lead in the saws and you have to have good collars that support the saws without dishing them one way or the other.
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Sawmill Forum: After close inspection of the log and the blade I discovered that one of the teeth had broken off and embedded in the log long enough for every other tooth to slam into it. On close inspection, the point of the shoulder (that’s where the ba
08-01-2009

Articles at Seneca Saw Works, Burdett, NY, Saw Sales, Service, Troubleshooting, Sawmill Forum: After close inspection of the log and the blade I discovered that one of the teeth had broken off and embedded in the log long enough for every other tooth to slam into it. On close inspection, the point of the shoulder (that’s where the ba

Damaged tip of shoulder.

My basic philosophy about welding these saws it that it is best to avoid it if possible. It’s not that I mind welding saws or making money, though.
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Sawmill Forum I discovered that the shaft broke right inside of the third of four bearings. Should I have it welded back together?
07-01-2009
Knowing that the pins are supposed to shear first, let’s see
if we can solve the mystery of why the shaft broke.
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Sawmill Forum I had a bit of an accident with my saw.
06-01-2009

Articles at Seneca Saw Works, Burdett, NY, Saw Sales, Service, Troubleshooting, Sawmill Forum   I had a bit of an accident with my saw.

"Two diametrically opposed blue spots."

The simple answer is to screw up your courage and open the throttle up to your normal speed. You will be amazed when that crazy wobble disappears.
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Sawmiil Forum - One of my saws just doesn’t seem to run right.
05-01-2009
I have checked everything I could think of in the mill.
The track is straight and I had the collars redone and
I still have trouble with that saw. My other saw seems
to run okay. Do you have any ideas?
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A saw doctor’s advice to a good friend who was recently diagnosed with a treatable, yet very serious form of cancer.
04-01-2009
This advice should apply to anyone in that position, but I warn
you, taking the advice of a saw doctor about medical issues
does not relieve you of the responsibility of consulting with
medical doctors. I should also warn you to never consult with
medical doctors on saw related issues.
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Sawmill Forum Working on 60: Saws
03-03-2009
I have been hammering saws for a number of years
now, but every time I do a 60” saw, I seem to have
trouble with it and much less confidence in the results
than with smaller saws. What am I doing wrong? Are
60” saws that much harder to hammer?
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Sawmill Forum - While You Wait
02-01-2009
While You Wait
When I first started hammering saws for a living, it was quite
apparent that the trade of saw hammering was supposed to
be a big secret.
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Sawmill Forum - Trends
01-01-2009
Trends, from one saw doctor’s perspective.
I have seen a number of trends in the past few years that I
would definitely consider to be worth watching in the new year
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December 2008 Saw Doctor
12-01-2008
When it comes to smithing saws, can you do it all with just a stretcher roll? Is there any need for a hammer?
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